Travels

First passenger plane lands in Antarctica

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A passenger jet made a historic landing on the new ice landing strip in the Antarctic territory belonging to Australia and in a few weeks regular flights will be launched.

I see people searching the internet to get the ticket to Antarctica - no, Ryanair does not fly there yet - but here comes the only catch: the trips aboard the Airbus A319 to the Wilkins track are only allowed to scientists and researchers, without any plan to open a regular line for tourists, as confirmed by project manager Charlton Clark.

Well, let's understand: knowing the human species, in a couple of years the area was going to be like a manure. It is what it is.

The track is 4 kilometers long and 700 meters wide and travels about 12 meters southwest per year as a result of glacier displacement.

In the first landing made last December, the plane managed to stop completely after traveling just 1 kilometer of runway despite the lack of grip of the wheels on the ice.

Clark said the works - with a budget of about 8.7 million dollars - had begun in 2005 with workers living in transport containers around the track, which is 70 kilometers from Casey's Australian research station. "Just living in that environment, at 35 degrees below zero and 100 knot winds, apart from everything and working alone, was an incredible challenge," said Clark.

Using laser technology, they graduated and smoothed the ice and should keep it careful so that there is never snow on the track.

The track is named after the famous adventurer and aviator Sir Hubert Wilkins, who was the first man to make a flight to Antarctica 79 years ago. Scientists and specialists working in Australian Antarctic field stations, which until now had made their journeys by sea, can now do so by plane, saving travel days.

Other nations like New Zealand and South Africa had landed on the icy continent, but always with military planes.

So if you want to be one of those who can access this privileged trip, or you slip into the suitcase of a scientist or study to become one of them!

Source: Google news

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